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Special Series

Water Resources Outlook

Series No

Report No

Title/Description/Authors (listed alphabetically)

NTIS/Vol/Pg

Available Download

2007-WRO-R-03

07-R-3 

U.S. Water Demand, Supply and Allocation: Trends and Outlook
Given the overall importance of water, the long-term adequacy of water supply is a major national concern. This first in a series of Water Resources Outlook papers reviews future trends and uncertainties affecting water resources in the United States over the next 30 years. It discusses their impacts and implications for water demand, supply and allocation in specific geographic regions of the country. The implications include considerations on how the U.S. Federal government, states and localities might address the impacts of those trends. The review described in this paper, while not being a part of a congressional inquiry, has been initiated by IWR to support iterative strategic planning activities of the USACE Civil Works, including the development of strategic goals, objectives and strategies.
Benedykt Dziegielewski , PhD ; Jack Kiefer , PhD
Dec 2006

NTIS: 

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 90

2007-WRO-R-03     

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( pdf, 1.9 MB )  

2007-WRO-R-04

07-R-4 

Natural and Human-Induced Disasters and Other Factors Affecting Future Emergency Response and Hazard Management: Trends and Outlook
The steady increase in losses from natural hazards over the past 46 years—both nationally and globally—challenges the effectiveness of traditional approaches to hazard mitigation and loss reduction. While it is impossible to plan and prepare for every worst case disaster scenario, there is a common set of factors that drive catastrophic outcomes. This third in a series of Water Resources Outlook papers identifies challenges over the next 30 years to the emergency management system. Then it describes how the nation's emergency management agencies can move from a reactive to proactive posture based on developing a resilient disaster risk management system. Finally, it suggests future roles for the Corps.
Susan Cutter ; Melanie Gall
Oct 2007

NTIS: 

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 86

2007-WRO-R-04     

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( pdf, 2.2 MB )  

2007-WRO-R-05

07-R-5 

Maritime Transportation System: Trends and Outlook
USACE major responsibilities for waterborne commerce include dredging, development and maintenance of the inland and coastal waterways and related maritime infrastructure, and navigation aids. A firm understanding of marine transportation conditions and trends is critical in discharging those responsibilities. The U.S. Maritime Transportation System (MTS) no longer exists in isolation, but must interact with ports, land carriers, customers, communities, environmental restrictions and security concerns. This second in a series of Water Resources Outlook papers is intended to develop an understanding of the challenges faced by the MTS over the next 30 years and suggests roles for the private and governmental sectors, including the Corps. It is intended to provide a strong, fact-based foundation for policy, planning and priorities.
CDM The Tioga Group
Mar 2007

NTIS: 

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 164

2007-WRO-R-05     

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( pdf, 2.9 MB )  

2008-VSP-01 2008-WRO-01

2008-VSP-01 

Energy & Water Nexus. Why Should the Corps Care?
Water and energy are the two renewable resources that are most essential for human livelihood. Whereas we have been mostly concerned with non-renewable resources, as the human population grows in size and in terms of the impact that it has on the biosphere, the renewable resources become equally important. The water sector, including treatment and conveyance, is presently one of the largest users of energy, comparable to the paper and refining industries. As it will become increasingly hard to provide additional supply, we will need to pay attention to managing demand. By providing expertise and technology for integrated water management, as well as by discharging its regulatory missions, the Army Corps of Engineers is uniquely placed to recognize energy/water interactions and to contribute to demand reduction efforts.
Alexey Voinov , PhD
Aug 2008

NTIS: 

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 48

2008-VSP-01 2008-WRO-01     

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( pdf, 1.8 MB )  

2008-WRO-P-01

08-P-1 

Budget Constraints and the Corps Consideration of Public-Private Par tnerships: Where Is the Money Going to Come From?
Federal, local, and state discretionary funds are constrained and are projected downward over the next 50 years. Corps appropriated funds are hard to come by. The Corps also relies on discretionary and cost-sharing funds with state and local governments. This Water Resources Outlook paper considers the expansion of Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) as a potential solution to Corps financial constraints and a means to improve overall efficiency.
Norm Starler ; Erin Wilson
Dec 2008

NTIS: 

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 42

2008-WRO-P-01     

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( pdf, 830 KB )  

2011-WRO-P-02

2011-WRO-P-02 

Outlook for the Corps of Engineers Hydropower Program
This Outlook Paper examines the state of federal hydropower in the U.S. in the context of contemporary requirements for multi-use operations and other water users. The Corps of Engineers hydropower business is at a critical crossroads, where current decisions will determine its ability to contribute to renewable energy solutions in the 21st century. It is now facing unique challenges and opportunities. While the Corps is the largest owner/operator of hydropower in the U.S., it is highly constrained by the authorities given to it by Congress, by multiple, competing demands for water within river basins, and by the financial and regulatory environment within which it must operate. New ways of doing business will be needed if the Corps is to realize the new opportunities available to it today. If the Corps and other hydropower stakeholders can come together in pursuit of current opportunities, then hydropower has a bright future as part of renewable energy portfolios across the U.S. in the next century. The path forward depends in large part on whether new ways can be found to make hydropower compatible with the environment and competitive with other energy sources.
Michael J. Sale
May 2011

NTIS: 

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 80

2011-WRO-P-02     

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( pdf, 2.5 MB )  

 
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